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Posts Tagged ‘Shakuhachi’

History (Tokuyama Takashi): Together with Koku and Kyorei (recorded on Volumes I and II), this work is treasured as one of the „three traditional masterpieces.“ The story goes that a mendicant, shakuhachi- playing monk, Kichiku, while spending the night at the temple of Kokuzodo on Mt. Asakuma in Ise, had a dream in which he put to sea in a boat, where, enveloped in mist, he heard the dulcet sounds of a flute. On awakening, he created this piece from the melody he had heard in the dream. Though it consists of a simple, repeated phrase, the tune has a grace and elegance about it, and is thought to be the original melody of the shakuhachi classical repertoire, on which many other works are based.

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0:00 Sokaku reibo [巣鶴鈴慕] | Player: Goro Yamaguchi [山口五郎] 20:54 San’an [産安] | Player: Katsuya Yokoyama [横山勝也] 28:04 Kogarashi [木枯] | Player: Hozan Yamamoto [山本邦山] 35:38 Shika no tone [鹿の遠音] | Players: Katsuya Yokoyama & Reibo Aoki [横山勝也, 青木鈴慕]

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Suzuru or Sokaku (Godan Sugomori) / Yoshinobu Taniguchi – A piece of the highest level difficulty among the Koden Honkyoku works, depicting the life cycle of a crane; its arrival by flight, courtship, nesting, laying eggs, brooding, growth, fluttering of the wings, and fledging, by using sound patterns unique to the shakuhachi.

Ein Stück mit dem höchsten Schwierigkeitsgrad unter den Koden Honkyoku-Werken, das den Lebenszyklus eines Kranichs darstellt: seine Ankunft durch Flug, Balz, Nisten, Eiablage, Brüten, Wachstum, Flügelschlagen und Ausfliegen, unter Verwendung von Klangmustern, die der Shakuhachi eigen sind.

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A gem from an old audio tape , exerpt of 2 Riley’Lee s albums from the early 80’s… For the hisssss , well just think about some wind… only for sharing 🙂

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The music was composed originally for voice. It was sung within the context of Christian observances. It was composed by a female Catholic mystic and magistra (spiritual teacher) living in the 12th century in what is now Germany. Here it is performed on a bamboo flute, which developed in Japan 500 years later, in the 17th century, as a mediative tool within the Zen Buddhism tradition. The performer is a male of Chinese/Irish/English ancestry, born in Texas in the mid 1950s and living in Australia. The recording was made in the 21st century, nearly one thousand years after Hildegard composed the song. And yet…. it works!

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[00:00] A1. Murezuru (Flock of crane) [18:53] B1. Gyō kokū (? Practicing the space/emptiness) [27:51] B2. Umi (Ocean) [34:35] B3. Issoku (One breath)

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(1) Saji 薩慈 (2) 6:32 Hon Shirabe 本調 (3) 12:47 Sugagaki 菅垣 (4) 14:51 Mushirabe 無調 (5) 16:01 Tsuru no Sugomori (Dokyoku) 鶴の巣籠 (6) 18:53 San’ya (Dokyoku) 三谷 (7) 30:17 San’an 産安 (8) 39:40 Sagari Ha (Kansai) 下り葉 (9) 41:20 Sagari Ha (Oshu) 下り葉 (奥州) (10) 44:31 Kokû (Dokyoku) 虚空 (11) 53:05 Tamuke 手向 (12) 56:13 Hi Fu Mi no Shirabe 一二三の調 (13) 58:06 Hon Shirabe 本調 (14) 01:00:05 Yamagoe (aka Reiho) 鈴法 (15) 01:03:17 Shingetsu 心月.

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