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Posts Tagged ‘Saturdaychorale’

Jean Lhéritier’s five-part (SATTB) setting of Nigra Sum  from the Song of Songs sung here at a live performance given on May 5th 2013 at St. Vincent Catholic Church, Los Angeles. I’ve put the text as set by Lhéritier below the video. Enjoy :-). mfi.-

Jean Lhéritier (±1480 — ±1552): Nigra sum a 5 — Live Flos Campi

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Luca Marenzio, better known for his madrigals than his sacred music although he did produce one book of sacred madrigals his Motectorum pro festis totius anni in 1585 from which this setting of  O Rex gloriae (O King of glory) the Antiphon to the Magnificat for Second Vespers at Ascension comes. It’s a four-part setting (SATB) that’s dramatic, colourful, and very madrigalian in form. It’s performed here by the Coro de Cámara de Madrid as part of the International Festival of Toledo conducted by Ana Fernández-Vega. Enjoy :-). – http://saturdaychorale.com/2016/05/27/luca-marenzio-1554-1599-o-rex-gloriae/

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Taverner’s Dum transisset Sabbatum has been much on my mind lately. It’s sung below by The Sixteen, conducted by Harry Christophers. Enjoy :-). markfromireland

John Taverner (±1490-1545): Dum transisset Sabbatum

 

 

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William Mundy’s six-part (SSATBB) psalm motet Adhaesit pavimento sets verses from psalm 119 (118 in the Vulgate) gets its name from verse twenty five Adhaesit pavimento anima mea(My soul has cleaved to the dust) which is its first line. English composers of Mundy’s generation were well aware of Josquin’s psalm settings and sought to emulate them at least a couple of times. Mundy’s psalm settings are, I think, some of his most beautiful music. Adhaesit pavimento consists of very densely woven through-composed polyphony that’s inspired by continental psalmody but which is nevertheless distinctively English.

:-).- 

William Mundy (±1529-1591): Adhaesit pavimento

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Gaffurio is now remembered as a scholar and a theoretician rather than as a composer. He was very influential during his lifetime and for about a century after. He stands out as an Italian at a time when the choirs and musical ensembles of the courts, colleges, and cathedrals were dominated by composers from the North such as Josquin and Weerbeke. He wound up working for the Sforza family in Milan where he greatly expanded the repertoire of the cathedral there… – 

Franchino Gaffurio (1451 – 1522): Salve Regina

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There’s a wealth of beautifully played music in this list which ends with a video in which Schiff discusses Bach you can use the links listed below to jump to the individual performances or watch them in their entirety in the playlist I’ve embedded below. Enjoy :-). mfi

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When Frederick Augustus the Elector of Saxony known as Augustus the Strong, whose love of the arts and music made Dresden a beacon of the arts in the early 18th century died on February 1st 1733 an entire year of protocols and grand ceremonial occasions were organised by the state to mourn his passing. The exigencies of religous politics in his domains meant that these had to encompass and satisfy the religious sensibilities of both his Catholic and protestant subjects. Zelenka who had been acting as Kapellmeister at the Dresden court following Heinichen’s death in 1729 was responsible for writing both the Officium defunctorium (Office of the Dead) and the Requiem as part of the Catholic ceremonies. This week’s ‚Sunday Concert‘ which covers the Officium defunctorium is the first of two in which I deal with Zelenka’s Officium defunctorium and his Requiem.-

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Pelham Humfrey was one of the ‚forwardest & brightest‘ boys recruited for the Chapel Royal as part of Charles II’s to restore English Church Music to its former glory. Sadly he died young but during his short career he produced some excellent music including songs such as Sleep downy sleep come close mine eyes which you can hear below.- saturdaychorale

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On Sunday October 25th 1415 – St Crispin’s Day an English army led by the their king Henry V, fought a French army that included pretty much the entire of the French military establishment and a goodly portion of the political establishment, during the battle which is one of the most famous English victories ever, the English who were considerably outnumber inflicted a defeat upon the French that was so severe, so heavy, that it would be somewhat more accurate to describe the „Battle of Agincourt“ as the „Massacre of Agincourt“. There are all sorts of myths and misconceptions about the battle and if you’re interested in learning more I can thoroughly recommend this superb article by Bernard Cornwell here The Battle of Agincourt: why should we remember it? in the British newspaper The Daily Telegraph.

Deo gracias, Anglia, redde pro victoria!

Owre Kynge went forth to Normandy
With grace and myght of chyvalry
Ther God for hym wrought mervelusly;
Wherfore Englonde may call and cry
Deo gracias.

saturdaychorale.com/

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