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Posts Tagged ‘Open Culture’

The video comes courtesy of Sassy Justice, the new deepfake satire show from the makers of South Park. Enjoy.

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If you’ve seen Pink Floyd in the news lately, it’s maybe because guitarist David Gilmour recently put up his collection of over 120 guitars for a charity auction, fetching “certifiably insane” prices like a whopping $3.975 million for the famous black Strat played on Dark Side of the Moon. (The guitar now “wears the crown as the world’s most expensive six string,” notes Enmore Audio.)

But there’s more going on with ex-Pink Floyd members than Gilmour’s guitars or Roger Waters’ political activism. Drummer Nick Mason, long renowned post-Floyd for his hugely expensive car collection, has taken on another role this month: as a podcast host and music historian in a nine-part series for the Open University/BBC production, The Documentary Podcast. – openculture.com

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Artist Andy Warhol shot over 500 silent, black-and-white screen-tests in his famous Factorybetween 1964 and 1966, documenting the beautiful youth who were drawn to the scene. Sometimes he would chat with the subject beforehand, offering suggestions to help them achieve the type of performance he was looking for. More frequently he took a passive role, to the point of leaving the room during the filming.

http://www.openculture.com/2018/09/watch-andy-warhols-screen-tests-of-three-female-muses.html

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William Blake earned his place as the patron saint of all freethinking outsider artists. One might say he perfected the role as he perfected his art—or his arts rather, since his poetry inspires as much awe and acclaim as his visionary engravings and illustrations. Standing astride the Neoclassical eighteenth century and the Romantic era, Blake rejected the rationalism and classicism that surrounded him from birth and developed a prophetic style drawn from an earlier age.- openculture.com

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Open Culture

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„Whoever tries to imitate me is lost,“ said the Soviet filmmaker Sergei Parajanov. Not so long ago, whoever tried to imitate him would also be in deep trouble. Persecuted by the Soviet authorities for the „subversive“ nature of both his work and his lifestyle, he spent four years of the 1970s in a Siberian hard-labor camp. Nothing could speak more highly to his artistry than the fact that, even before his sentencing, Andrei Tarkovsky wrote a letter in his defense. „Artistically, there are few people in the entire world who could replace Parajanov,“ argued the director of Mirrorand Stalker. „He is guilty – guilty of his solitude. We are guilty of not thinking of him daily and of failing to discover the significance of a master.“ – open culture

 

 

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Why, 35 years after his death, do so many music lovers still respect Glenn Gould above all other pianists? One might assume that, since he played the work of such well-known composers as Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Haydn, and Brahms, he would have acceptable substitutes among the most highly skilled pianists of each successive generation. But none have ever taken Gould’s place, and quite possibly none ever will. His distinctiveness owes both to sheer aptitude, and to something else besides: Leonard Bernstein attempts an explanation of that something in the clip above, from the CBS Ford Presents broadcast of January 31, 1960… openculture.com

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What living director has drawn the descriptor “surreal” more often than David Lynch? If you’ve seen, or rather experienced, a few of his films — particularly EraserheadLost HighwayMulholland Dr., or Inland Empire, or even the first half of his television series Twin Peaks — you know he’s earned it. Like any surrealist worth his salt, Lynch creates his own version of reality, with its own set of often unfathomable and inexplicably but emotionally and psychologically resonant qualities. In 1987, the year after his breakthrough Blue Velvet opened in theaters, the BBC apparently thought him enough of an authority on the matter of cinematic surrealism to enlist him to present an episode of Arena on the subject.

http://www.openculture.com/2013/10/david-lynch-presents-the-history-of-surrealist-film-1987.html

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„I saw and heard something remarkable just a few hours ago,“ wrote New Yorker editor David Remnick a little over five years ago, „something I’m not likely to forget until all the mechanisms of remembering are shot and I’m tucked away for good.“ He had attended an eightieth-birthday celebration for the late Philip Roth at the Newark Museum. There, after a series of tributes from fellow literary figures including Jonathan Lethem, Hermione Lee, and Edna O’Brien, the Newark-born-and-raised novelist gave what Remnick described as „the most astonishing literary performance I’ve ever witnessed.“

http://www.openculture.com/2018/05/hear-philip-roth-read-five-major-novels-sabbaths-theater-ghost-writer.html

 

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