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Posts Tagged ‘markfromireland’

Taverner’s Dum transisset Sabbatum has been much on my mind lately. It’s sung below by The Sixteen, conducted by Harry Christophers. Enjoy :-). markfromireland

John Taverner (±1490-1545): Dum transisset Sabbatum

 

 

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On Sunday October 25th 1415 – St Crispin’s Day an English army led by the their king Henry V, fought a French army that included pretty much the entire of the French military establishment and a goodly portion of the political establishment, during the battle which is one of the most famous English victories ever, the English who were considerably outnumber inflicted a defeat upon the French that was so severe, so heavy, that it would be somewhat more accurate to describe the „Battle of Agincourt“ as the „Massacre of Agincourt“. There are all sorts of myths and misconceptions about the battle and if you’re interested in learning more I can thoroughly recommend this superb article by Bernard Cornwell here The Battle of Agincourt: why should we remember it? in the British newspaper The Daily Telegraph.

Deo gracias, Anglia, redde pro victoria!

Owre Kynge went forth to Normandy
With grace and myght of chyvalry
Ther God for hym wrought mervelusly;
Wherfore Englonde may call and cry
Deo gracias.

saturdaychorale.com/

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William Byrd’s Domine secundum actum meum. I’ve uploaded this performance by Altamire under the direction of David Skinner to be able to discuss and contrast it with the performance by he Cardinall’s Musick. Which you can hear and see here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8zV_Lz…

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The Choir of Somerville College, Oxford
Robert Smith (conductor)
Somerville College Chapel, Oxford
10 June 2012 – saturdaychorale.com/

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Tye seems to have composed a fair amount of Latin religious music before Feb 20th 1547 when Edward Tudor was crowned Edward VI of King of England and Tye in common with every other composer who wanted to keep life and limb intact switched to composing in English. This setting of the Mass is Henrician and as its source is the Peterhouse Partbooks it must date from sometime before 1540… saturdaychorale.com/

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The text Dufay’s Marian three-part (ATT) motet Flos FLorum is to be found in the Analecta hymnica medii aevi. It’s a song motet which means firstly that Dufay composed the melody in its entirety making no reference to the chant, and secondly that unlike previous generations‘ motets their form is neither inferred nor derived from the rhythmic periodicity of the the line. It’s not isorhythmic in other words…-

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Adrian Willaert’s four-part motet Saluto te sancta virgo must have made quite an impression on his contemporaries because it can be found in a number of sources not the least of which is the Medici Codex, a collection of 53 motets compiled for Pope Leo X (the first Medici pope) and presented by him as a wedding gift to his nephew Lorenzo de‘ Medici, Duke of Urbino, when the latter returned to Italy from France with his new bride Madeleine de la Tour d’Auvergne in 1518.- saturdaychorale

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Josquin’s motet Absalon, fili mi is unique. The text in which David mourns the killing of his son Absalon who had risen in rebellion against him deviates from the Biblical text and was almost certainly compiled by Josquin himself:

Absalon fili mi,
quis det ut moriar pro te, Absalon?
Non vivam ultra (from Job) ,
sed descendam in infernum (from Psalm 54) plorans.

it strenghtens and dramatises the mood of the piece. Josquin’s polyphony throughout the motet serves to emphasise rather than obscure the relationship between word and tone and completely humanises the text. A feat that few of his contemporaries could have accomplished. It’s sung below by the excellent Dufay ensemble. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland – saturdaychorale

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Josquin’s setting of the Pater Noster was one of many fifteenth century settings of the text either as an anthem or as a motet that used the plainchant melody as the foundation on which they built their own work. Josquin’s six-part setting is a particularly lovely example of this… It’s sung wonderfully well below by The Choir of The Abbey School, Tewkesbury. You’ll find the text and translation below the fold as well. Enjoy 🙂 saturdaychorale.com

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